Person:Amatoya Moytoy (4)

Find records: marriage
Amatoya Moytoy
d.1730
m. 1634-1635
  1. Pasmere Carpenter1637 - 1696
  2. Amatoya Moytoy1640 - 1730
m. 1680
  1. Tistoe Moytoy
  2. Oukah-Ulah Moytoy
  3. Do-yo-sti1678-1701 - 1723-1789
  4. Pigeon of Tellico1680 - 1730
  5. Nancy Moytoy1683 - 1741
  6. Kanagatoga Moytoy1690 - 1761
  7. Annawakee Moytoy1710 -
  • HChief Amatoya Moytoy, of Tellico1645 - 1692-1749
  1. Oo-lou-sta1720 - 1783
Facts and Events
Name[1][6] Amatoya Moytoy
Unknown[1] A-ma-do-ya
Alt Name[2] Moytoy of Tainesi
Unknown[5] Trader Carpenter
Gender Male
Birth[1][5] ca 1640 Chota, Blount, Tennessee, United States
Marriage 1680 Cherokee Nationto Quatsy of Tellico
Death[2][9] 1730

Personal Data

A-MA-DO-YA MOYTOY (pronounced mah-tie) was born Abt. 1640 in Chota.S1

There has been a lot of confusion about the descendants of Moytoy. I think this is because some people are not aware that there were two Chief Moytoys. The first was Chief Amatoya Moytoy of Chota, b abt 1640, who married Quatsy of Tellico (of the Wolf Clan). The second is Chief Moytoy, aka the Pigeon of Tellico, b abt 1687. The second Moytoy is believed to be either the son or grandson of Amatoya Moytoy.S1

Amatoya Moytoy of Chota was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (from the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer."S8

His father was a European, Thomas Pasmere Carpenter, who was descended from the noble Anglo-Norman family of Vicomte Guillaume de Melun le Carpentier. Thus, Moytoy's European lineage can be traced to the Frankish Duke Ansegisel of Metz Meroving, Peppin II, and Charles Martel. This ancestry also makes the Cherokee Moytoys cousins to the Carpenter Earl of Tyrconnell, and thus related to the current British royal family.S8

Amatoya was taught by his father to “witch” for water with a willow stick. He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I. He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730.S8

In 1680, Amatoya married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century.S8

More About A-MA-DO-YA MOYTOY:S1

  • Blood: Full Blood Cherokee
  • Translation: A-ma = Water (Am-a = Salt), Do-ya = Beaver

Relationship Chart: Grandparents to GrandchildrenS2 Image:Moytoy-Chart1.jpg

References
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Amatoya Moytoy, in Descendants of A-ma-do-ya Moytoy, Generation No. 1, Questionable quality.

    http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/h/i/c/James-R-Hicks-VA/BOOK-0001/0021-0001.html. Also recorded at http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mysouthernfamily/myff/d0001/g0000054.html.
    Additional sources cited by this source:
    * Family Roots on Ancestry.com updated: Feb 6 2003; Contact: Kerry Wheeler EMail: family_roots@sbcglobal.net Home page: http://www.geocities.com/familyrootspage/FamilyRoots.html; Ancestry.com One World Tree http://trees.ancestry.com/owt/person.aspx?pid=9974194
    * Carter & West Families on Ancestry.com Updated: Mon Sep 9 2002 by Contact: Craig Carter EMail: carter_craig400@hotmail.com

  2. 2.0 2.1 Moytoy I Chota (of Tainesi), in Rodovid, 19 May 2008, Questionable quality.
  3.   Amatoya Moytoy, in Salzman, Rob. 700,000 People Connected with European Royalty, 11 May 2009, Questionable quality.

    Information and data pertaining to Chief Amatoya Moytoy and his offspring.

  4.   Amatoya Moytoy, in The Pumpkin's Roots, 13 Apr 2009, Questionable quality.

    Introduction and disclaimer at American Indian Families, and more specifically, http://www.three-systems.com/Gen/moytoy/d0000/g0000000.html#3407.

  5. 5.0 5.1 Trader Carpenter, in Mitchell, Mari. Granny Witches. Life's Gremlins. (Writing.com, 6 Oct 2008), Unreliable quality.

    Twenty year old Thomas Pasmere Carpenter came to Jamestown, Virginia from England in 1627, living in a cave near the Shawnee. Thomas was called "Cornplanter" by the Shawnee, derived from their sign language that matched as near as possible to the work of a carpenter. He married a Shawnee woman named "Pride" and bore a son around 1635 named Trader Carpenter. Trader was taught to “witch” for water with a willow stick by the Shawnee.

  6. Amatoya Moytoy, in Mitchell, Mari. Granny Witches. Life's Gremlins. (Writing.com, 6 Oct 2008), Unreliable quality.

    He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I.

  7.   Trader Carpernter, in Wikipedia: Appalacian Granny Magic article, 11 June 2008, Questionable quality.

    Twenty year old Thomas Pasmere Carpenter came to Jamestown, Virginia from England in 1627, living in a cave near the Shawnee. Thomas was called "Cornplanter" by the Shawnee, derived from their sign language that matched as near as possible to the work of a carpenter. He married a Shawnee woman named "Pride" and bore a son around 1635 named Trader Carpenter.

    Trader was taught to “witch” for water with a willow stick by the Shawnee. He married a Shawnee named Locha in 1658 and the clan grew quickly. In 1660, they were driven south by the Iroquois. They moved along the Tennessee River, starting the villages of Running Water (where Thomas died in 1675), Nickajack, Lookout Mountain, Crowtown and Chota. He was Chief of Chota, which was created as a merging place of refuge for people of all tribes, history or color. It became similar to a capital for the Cherokee nation. These villages grew to about 2000 people by 1670 when the Carpenter clan moved to Talikwa (Great Tellico) where the Tellico River emerges from the Appalachian Mountains. Here Trader married a Cherokee, Quatsy of the Wolf Clan in 1680. He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I.

    In 1730, his son, Trader-Tom (Moytoy II) took over as Chief, receiving what was described as the “Crown of Tannassy”. Tanasi was where the previous Chief resided and the traditional headdress was passed on to him. The fur trading Carpenter family owned many ships. Though he served as Cherokee Chief, Thomas made several trips to Barbados over the years where the Carpenters did banking, and even to Scotland and Ireland. On occasion he took Trader, and Trader Tom with him. They traded furs and healing herbs brought from America.

  8.   Amatoya Moytoy, in Sharon. Amatoya Moytoy 1640-1730: Founder of a Family of Chiefs. (The James Scrolls: A GeneaBlog), Questionable quality.

    Amatoya Moytoy of Chota (pronounced mah-tie) was a Cherokee town chief of the early eighteenth century in the area of present-day Tennessee. He held a prominent position among the Cherokee, and held the hereditary title Ama Matai (From the French matai and Cherokee ama--water), which meant "Water Conjurer." His father was a European, Thomas Pasmere Carpenter, who was descended from the noble Anglo-Norman family of Vicomte Guillaume de Melun le Carpentier. Thus, Moytoy's European lineage can be traced to the Frankish Duke Ansegisel of Metz Meroving, Peppin II, and Charles Martel. This ancestry also makes the Cherokee Moytoys cousins to the Carpenter Earl of Tyrconnell, and thus related to the current British royal family.

    Amatoya was taught by his father to “witch” for water with a willow stick. He had become so adept at water witching that the Cherokee called him "water conjurer" or Ama Matai (Ama is Cherokee for water). Ama Matai eventually became pronounced as Amatoya. It was later shortened to “Moytoy”, so he is known as Moytoy I. He ruled the town of Chota sometime between the beginning of the eighteenth century and 1730. In 1680, Amatoya married Quatsie of Tellico. Many of their descendants went on to become prominent leaders, founding a family that effectively ruled the Cherokee for a century.

  9. Relationship chart - Moytoy's grandparents to grandchildren