Person:Alice de Lacy (1)

Alice Plantagenet, 4th Countess of Lincoln
b.25 Dec 1281
d.2 Oct 1348
  1. Alice Plantagenet, 4th Countess of Lincoln
m. Bef 28 Oct 1294
Facts and Events
Name Alice Plantagenet, 4th Countess of Lincoln
Unknown Alice de Lacy
Gender Female
Birth[1] 25 Dec 1281
Marriage Bef 28 Oct 1294 to Thomas Plantagenet, 2nd Earl of Lancaster
Death[1] 2 Oct 1348


the text in this section is copied from an article in Wikipedia

Alice de Lacy, suo jure 4th Countess of Lincoln, suo jure 5th Countess of Salisbury (25 December 1281, Denbigh Castle – 2 October 1348, Barlings Abbey) was an English peeress.

Born on Christmas Day 1281, Alice was the only daughter and heir of Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln and Margaret Longespée, 4th Countess of Salisbury suo jure (in her own right). Her mother Margaret was the great-granddaughter and ultimate heiress of one of the illegitimate sons of Henry II of England, William Longespée (Longsword), whose nickname became his surname.

In her long and eventful life Alice was married three times, the first time at the age of 12; widowed three times; abducted; imprisoned; raped; and her inheritance extorted from her. Yet throughout her life she remained generous and respected by her subordinates and those who were dependent upon her.[1]

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References
  1. 1.0 1.1 Alice Plantagenet, 4th Countess of Lincoln, in Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia. (Online: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc.).
  2.   ALICE de Lacy ([Denbigh Castle] 25 Dec 1281-2 Oct 1348, bur Barlings Abbey, Birling, Kent)., in Cawley, Charles. Medieval Lands: A prosopography of medieval European noble and royal families.
  3.   Alice de Lacy, in Lundy, Darryl. The Peerage: A genealogical survey of the peerage of Britain as well as the royal families of Europe.