Person:Alexander Black (11)

Alexander Black, of the Cowpasture, Augusta County, VA
b.ABT 1710 At sea, Ireland
d.BEF 20 NOV 1764 Augusta County, Virginia
  1. Alexander Black, of the Cowpasture, Augusta County, VAABT 1710 - BEF 1764
  • HAlexander Black, of the Cowpasture, Augusta County, VAABT 1710 - BEF 1764
  • WJane Miller
  1. James Black1728 - 1824
  2. Samuel Blackabt 1729/30 - 1783
  3. Capt. William BlackBET 1735 AND 1740 - 1811
  4. Mary Blackabt 1738 - 1805
  5. Margaret 'Peggy' Black1743 - 1784
  6. Nancy BlackABT 1748 - AFT 1764
  7. Rachel Black1750 - 1822
  8. Alexander Black, Jr.1752 - 1827
Facts and Events
Name[1][2][3] Alexander Black, of the Cowpasture, Augusta County, VA
Alt Name Alexr
Gender Male
Birth? ABT 1710 At sea, Ireland
Other? APR 1746 Highland tract. Alexander Black, just above the mouth of the Bullpasture with Richrd Bodkin, James Miller, John McCrearySettled
Other? 3 NOV 1750 250 acres in Augusta Co., VirginiaBought Land
Military? 1752 Alexander Black qualified as Lieutenant of Foot Soldiers before the County Court in Augusta County on August 20, 1752.
Death? BEF 20 NOV 1764 Augusta County, Virginia
Other? Pioneer settler of Cowpasture River Vallley, VAAward/Distinction
Other? ScotName Origination
Other? 20 NOV 1764 Wm. Black qualified administrator of father, Alexr Black, Augusta Co., VAEstate Record
Burial? Probably at the Blue Spring Presbyterian Church near the village of Williamsville in Bath Co., VA

Alexander Black was one of the Early Settlers of Augusta County, Virginia

Contents


Return to Old Augusta County!
Old Augusta
Black Tapestry
Register
Notebooks
Data
Analysis
Bibliography
YDNA
Index
Black Records
……………………..The Tapestry
Families Old Chester OldAugusta Germanna
New River SWVP Cumberland Carolina Cradle
The Smokies Old Kentucky

__________________________

Sources

Overview

From: "William Black and his Descenants" Raymond Finley Hughes 1973. Cited by Ancestry Trees (With slight formating changes to adjust for presentation on WeRelate):

ALEXANDER BLACK was born aboard ship when his parents came to America. His grandson, Major George Black, gave an interview to John D. Shane, which is among the Draper Papers in the library of the Wisconsin Historical Association, Madison, Wisconsin, describing the migration of the family from Virginia to Kentucky and stated that his grandfather was born at sea when his parents were on their way to this country but he failed to mention the names of the immigrants so we do not know the names of the first generation of this family in America. ALEXANDER BLACK first appeared in Augusta County (now Bath County) Virginia in 1746 where he purchased 250 acres of land on the Cowpasture River at the forks of the Bullpasture. In the history of Highland County, Va., by Morton, appears the following "Black, Scotch Irish appeared in the Bullpasture valley in 1746. Black was just above the mouth of the Bullpasture, where Maj. J. H. Byrd now lives (1919)." ...Alexander Black was granted a deed for his 250 acres of land at Richmond, Virginia on November 3, 1750. It appears almost certain that he came into Virginia from Pennsylvania with other Scotch Irish who settled in Virginia at that time, and that his parents died in Pennsylvania as no trace of them is found in the Augusta County records. Alexander Black qualified as Lieutenant of Foot Soldiers before the County Court in Augusta County on August 20, 1752. The writer has been unable to find any record of his service as a soldier, but suppose his company served as a local defense for the community... Alexander Black died in the year 1764. Name of his wife is unknown. I do not know where he was buried but probably at the Blue Spring Presbyterian Church near the village of Williamsville in Bath County. His farm of 250 acres on the Cowpasture River was divided between his two sons. He and his unknown wife were the parents of six known children:
1. William [who] indicates that Alexander's father was named William, after Scottish tradition.[4]
2. Alexander
3. Rachel
4. Mary
5. Nancy
6. Elizabeth (Peggy)[5]

Land

  • Land Grant: November 3, 1750 - Alexander Black was granted a deed for "250 acres in the fork of the Cowpasture River in Augusta County", at Richmond, Virginia. [Virginia Land Grants, B.K. Swartz].
The following transaction involves land that Alexander Black had acquired on the Cowpasture that apparently passed to his son William after Alexander Black's death in 1764:

Acquisition of Land from Chalkley's:

  • Page 86.--16th August, 1765. William Black and Sarah ( ) to Alex. Black, £40, 125 acres in Forks of Cowpasture River; corner to land in possession of said William Black; corner James Knox. Delivered: Alex. Black, 17th May, 1792. (Note: this land appears to have been a tranfer from William Black (this Alexander Black's son) and his wife Sarah Hicklin to his younger brother Alexander, sold after Alexander had died, probably delivered to his son Alexander, who would have been too young to have owned land in 1765. Probably involves land that passed to William as eldest son).

Estate

  • Vol 3, PP 80 - 89 = Page 361.--20th November, 1764. William Black's bond (with Jas.Knox, Jno. Miller), as administrator of Alexander Black.
  • Vol. 1 - NOVEMBER 20, 1764. - (156) Wm. Black qualified administrator of father, Alexr Black.
  • Vol. 3 - Page 377.--19th March, 1765. Alexander Black's appraisement (by Jno. McCreary, Jno. Carlile, Geo. Lewis): Money, silver money, gould money.

Records

From Chalkley's:

  • Page 441.--16th August, 1752. Ann Wright's appraisement by John McCreery, Wallace Estill, Alexander Black.
  • Vol. 1 - AUGUST 20, 1752. - (317) John Brown, qualified Major of Horse; Alexr. Sayers, qualified Captain of Horse; Robert Sayers, qualified Ensign; John McCreary, qualified Captain of Foot; Alexr. Black, qualified Lieut. of Foot; William Smith, qualified Captain of Foot; Thomas Gilham, qualified Captain of Foot; Robert Armstrong, qualified cornet; Joseph Coulton, qualified Captain of Troop of Horse; Andrew Hays, qualified Lieutenant of Foot; Hugh Hicklin, qualified Cornet.
  • Page 88.--16th August, 1765. William Jackson to Francis Jackson, £90, 170 acres in Cowpasture; corner to land in possession of Wm. Jackson, opposite land in possession of Alex Black. Teste: Robert Knox. Delivered: Francis Jackson, October Court, 1769.
  • Page 109.--18th October, 1769. Francis Jackson and Elizabeth ( ) to William Renick, £42, 170 acres on cowpasture; corner land in possession of William Jackson, opposite to land in possession of Alexander Black. Teste: William Mathews, J. Murray, Pat. Lockhart, Arthur Campbell. Delivered: William Renix, August Court, 1776.

Notes

Born "at sea" probably landing in Pennsylvania


SECTION IX EXTINCT FAMILIES BELOW is a sketch of certain families whose surname has become extinct. Only such are included as intermarried largely with resident families, or otherwise left a noticeable impression on local history. SYNOPSIS Black - S.-Irish - appeared 1746 - BP. GENEALOGY

Black. Alexander - at J. H. Byrd's on CP - D. 1764 - C-2 - 1. William - in G'brier in 1775. 2. Alexander (w. Nancy) - moved to Ky, 1797c. 3.? Samuel - b. 1729c, D. 1783 - lived n. Mry. - C-3 - John - William (w. Sarah) - Samuel (m. Mary Parker, 1797) - James - Margaret (m. John McCreary, 1786) - Mary (m. Jacob Kisling, 1798) - Martha - Nancy - Jane (m. John Peebles, 1792).

The pioneer was possibly related to the Rev. Samuel Black, a Presbyterian minister of Penna, who visited Aug. in 1747. Brantner. Samuel - rem. to Neb. 1868 - w. Sarah Orndorff - C-2 - Caroline (m. David Snyder) - Mary C. (m. Washington C. Snyder) - Ann E. (m. George W. Beverage) - Elizabeth (m. Morgan Waybright) - Frances - Alice - Rose - William (m. Elizabeth Hildebrand) - Straner - James. Brown. (A) Thomas - b. in Italy 1774 - D. on lower Shaw's F'k, 1862 - came when children were partly grown - m. Elizabeth Dick of Md. (b. 1778, D. 1851) C-2-

VA Land Record for Alexander Black, 1750

STATE LAND OFFICE RICHMOND VIRGINIA Deed Book No. 30 Page 375 Alexander Black 250 acres Nov. 3, 1750

Land in Augusta County in forks of the Cowpasture River, beginning at a hickory running up the several courses of the river 380 poles to a sugar tree on the bank of the corner to the lands in possession of James Miller, thence north eleven degrees (11°) west 84 poles to two black oaks and a white oak at the foot of the Mt., thence south fifty four degrees (54°) west 370 poles, thence south sixty four degrees (64°) east 98 poles to Clover Creek, thence down the several fourses 80 poles to the beginning.

Signed by John Robinson, James Wood, Harry Robinson, John Lewis

The above land was granted by the King of England to a land company composed of John Robinson, James Wood, Harry Robinson, and Johh Lewis dated Oct. 29, 1743. As payment the purchaser had to clear five acres of land each year for three years for each fifty acres purchased.

http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/ViewStory.aspx?tid=4775533&oid=1cccad34-8af3-4c5f-8f2e-c2e9df2366ab


Black comes from these clans in Scotland - Lamont, MacGregor, MacLean

Black — from either Old English bla(e)c "black"; or OE bla'c "bright, white, or pale"; or from the Gaelic names M'Ille Dhuibh or Mac Gille Dhuibh, "son of the black lad". Allied with Clans Lamont, MacGregor and Maclean.


Dr. George Fraser Black, former director of the New York Public Library and author of "Surnames of Scotland," said the Black surname was common in St. Andrews and Prestwick, Scotland, in the 15th and 16th centuries and was very common in Edinburgh in the 17th century.

Blak, Blac, and Blake were variations of the name common to the Lanark, Scotland area in the 14th century at the time when surnames were developing and becoming more common in popular usage. According to Dr. Black, many of the Blacks of Scotland actually originated within Clan Lamont (old Norse for "lawman"), indicating possible ancestral origins prior to Scotland in Scandinavia or northern Europe.

Other sources indicate the Black surname was prominent in Lincolnshire, England, but that many of these Blacks migrated to Angus, Scotland (Dundee, Forfar, Firth of Tay region), and eventually lost their identity when significant numbers of the Lamont, MacGregor, and MacLean clans of the Scottish Highlands changed their names to Black (or other colors such as White or Green) after the clan names were proscribed by King James. The action by the King and Parliament was due in part to the ongoing fighting among the clans including some long-term bloody disputes between Clan Campbell and Clan MacGregor and its allies. The primary ancestral home for many Scottish "Blacks" (clan sept: Lamont, MacGregor, and MacLean), would be in Argyll, Cowal, Bute, eastward to the Renfrew, Glasgow, Lanark regions of central Scotland.

http://www.angelfire.com/tn/blackfamily/


Clan Lamont From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

Crest badge suitable for wear by a member of Clan Lamont.Clan Lamont is a Highland Scottish clan. Clan Lamont claim descent from Lauman who lived in Cowal in 1238.[1] Tradition gives this Lauman a descent from an Irish prince named Anrothan O'Neill. Clan Lamont like several other clans, such as Clan MacEwen of Otter, Clan Maclachlan, Clan MacNeil of Barra, and the MacSweens, all claim descent from Anrothan O'Neill, who left Ireland for Kintyre in the 11th century. From this descent the clan claims a decent from the legendary Niall Noigíallach, High King of Ireland, who lived from the mid 4th century to early 5th century.

The darkest era of Clan Lamont was during the middle of the 17th century when about 100 Lamonts were massacred at Dunoon in 1646 by their powerful neighbours the Campbells. The clan did not take part in the Jacobite Risings. In the 19th century the clan chief emigrated to Australia, where the present chief of the clan lives. The clan lives today as the Clan Lamont Society, which was formed in 1895. The society meets once a year and accepts membership from anyone bearing the surname Lamont or any of the clan's associated names.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Lamont


Clan Gregor From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search

This article needs additional citations for verification.

Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2007)

A crest badge suitable for a member of Clan Gregor.Clan Gregor, or Clan MacGregor, is a Highland Scottish clan. Outlawed for nearly two hundred years after losing their lands in a long power struggle with the Clan Campbell, the Clan Gregor claims descent from Constantin and wife and cousin Malvina, first son of Doungallas and wife Spontana (daughter of a High King of Ireland) and grandson of Giric, the third son of Alpín mac Echdach, the father of Kenneth MacAlpin, the first King of Scotland, a descent which is proclaimed in the motto, 'S Rioghal Mo Dhream, translated as Royal is my Race.[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Gregor


Clan Maclean is a highland Scottish clan.


The Scots-Irish: The Thirteenth Tribe http://www.ulsterancestry.com/ulster-scots.html

As the years passed thousands of people crossed the Atlantic from Ulster, just as their ancestors had crossed the North Channel from Scotland a century or more before. However, by 1750 the pace of migration began to slow, as relatively normal conditions returned to Ulster after years of economic dislocation. The period of calm was all too brief. In 1771 a fresh wave of migration began, once again induced by the greed of the landlords, which was arguably to have serious consequences for the security of the British Empire in North America. Faced with a fresh series of rent hikes, local people at first mounted some resistance, gathered together in an organisation known as the Hearts of Steel; but the landlords had the law and the army on their side. In the short period left before the outbreak of the American Revolution a further 30,000 Ulstermen left for the colonies, joining some 200,000 who had already made their homes there earlier in the century. The contemporary image of the Ulster Protestant is most commonly that of the Orangeman, with all of his exaggerated loyalty to Britain and the Crown. For the dispossessed of the 1770s the opposite was true: they had lost everything, and came to America with an intense hostility towards all things British.

For the original Quaker and Puritan settlers of the thirteen colonies, largely English in origin, the emigrants of Ulster, an increasingly common sight, were usually described as ‘Irish.’ To counter this misconception the newcomers adopted the older description of ‘Scots’. It was in this semantic exchange that a new breed took shape: they were the ‘Scots-Irish.’ For many years these people had lived on a frontier in Ireland, and it seemed natural for them to push on to a new frontier, where land was both plentiful and cheap, introducing a new urgency and dynamism into a rather complacent colonial society. Before long these ‘backwoodsmen’, distrustful of all authority and government, had established a hold on the western wilderness, fighting Indians and wolves in much the same way that they had once fought wolves and woodkern. In Pennsylvania the Scots-Irish established an almost complete domination of the outer reaches of the old Quaker colony. It was a dangerous life, but one which has established a lasting image in American history and folklore:

‘He was a farmer so far as was needful and practicable out of the reach of all markets, though as often as not his corn was planted and his grass mown, with the long-barrelled short-stocked ponderous small-bore rifle upon which his life so often hung, placed ready and loaded against a handy stump. What sheep he could protect from the bears and the wolves, together with a patch of flax, provided his family with covering and clothing. Swarthy as an Indian and almost as sinewy, with hair falling to his shoulders from beneath a coon-skin cap, a buck-skin hunting shirt tied at his waist, his nether man was encased in an Indian breach-clout, and his feet clad in deer-skin and moccasins.’

With the outbreak of the Revolution in 1775 the Scots-Irish, in interesting contrast to many of their Scottish cousins, were among the most determined adherents of the rebel cause. Their frontier skills were particularly useful in destroying Burgoyne’s army in the Saratoga campaign; and George Washington was even moved to say that if the cause was lost everywhere else he would take a last stand among the Scots-Irish of his native Virginia. Serving in the British Army, Captain Johann Henricks, one of the much despised ‘Hessians’, wrote in frustration ‘Call it not an American rebellion, it is nothing more than an Irish-Scotch Presbyterian Rebellion.’ It was their toughness, virility and sense of divine mission that was to help give shape to a new nation, supplying it with such diverse heroes as Davy Crocket and Andrew Jackson. They were indeed God’s frontiersmen, the real historical embodiment of the lost tribe of Israel.


History of Highland County Pages 391

THE SETTLERS OF 150 YEARS AGO. It is, of course, impossible to present an accurate list of the householders who were here in 1761, after 15 yeass of settlement. A few f the names we found are probably those of non-residents. On the other hand there were people here who did not own land, and of such there is only casual mention Iin the record books. The following is therefore only an approximation to the actuial fact, the real number being doubtless somewhat larger than here appears. Nearly all were living in Stonewall and at the mouth of Bolar Run.

Black, Alexander. Black, Samuel. Hicklin, Hugh. Hicklin, John. Hicklin, Thomas. McCreary, John Miller, Hugh. Miller, James. Miller, John. Miller, William. http://boards.ancestry.com/mbexec/message/an/localities.britisles.scotland.general/2922.3055


The Scots-Irish Journey to the New World Introduction Origins and Terms Pre-1718 Migration to America Background to 1718 Where They Came From Why They Left Their Expectations The Voyage Their Arrival Reception in America The Search for a Home Londonderry, New Hampshire http://1718migration.org.uk/

In 1718, the first organized migration of Scots and Irish-born Presbyterian people left the north of Ireland on their way to a new life in the New England colonies in north America.

Parts of their story are familiar, but much has been forgotten. This website sets out what is known of the history of the Scots and Irish of the 1718 migration, and also reminds us of the lives of those who were left behind in Ireland......

After 1723, Londonderry, NH served as a staging post for many other Scots-Irish settlers in their journeys to Novia Scotia, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere.


Ulster Historical Foundation http://www.ancestryireland.co.uk/process_db_search_generic.php


AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA - CHALKLEY'S CHRONICLES; Vol 3, PP 80 - 89 Page 361.--20th November, 1764. William Black's bond (with Jas.Knox, Jno. Miller), as administrator of Alexander Black.

Page 377.--19th March, 1765. Alexander Black's appraisement (by Jno. McCreary, Jno. Carlile, Geo. Lewis): Money, silver money, gould money.

http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/augusta/court/3court8.txt


Why the Scots-Irish Emigrated http://www.people.virginia.edu/~mgf2j/irish.html


Source: Book "William Black and his Descendants" 1. ALEXANDER BLACK was born aboard ship when his parents came to America. His grandson, Major George Black, gave an interview to John D. Shane, which is among the Draper Papers in the library of the Wisconsin Historical Association, Madison, Wisconsin, describing the migration of the family from Virginia to Kentucky and stated that his grandfather was born at sea when his parents were on their way to this country but he failed to mention the names of the immigrants so we do not know the names of the first generation of this family in America. ALEXANDER BLACK first appeared in Augusta County (now Bath County) Virginia in 1746 where he purchased 250 acres of land on the Cowpasture River at the forks of the Bullpasture. In the history of Highland County, Va., by Morton, appears the following "Black, Scotch Irish appeared in the Bullpasture valley in 1746. Black was just above the mouth of the Bullpasture, where Maj. J. H. Byrd now lives (1919)." This land was granted by the King of England to a land company composed of John Robinson, James Wood, Harry Robinson and John Lewis, dated October 29, 1743, who in turn sold it to the homesteaders. As payment, the purchaser had to clear five acres of land each year for three years, for each fifty acres purchased. Alexander Black was granted a deed for his 250 acres of land at Richmond, Virginia on November 3, 1750. It appears almost certain that he came into Virginia from Pennsylvania with other Scotch Irish who settled in Virginia at that time, and that his parents died in Pennsylvania as no trace of them is found in the Augusta County records. Alexander Black qualified as Lieutenant of Foot Soldiers before the County Court in Augusta County on August 20, 1752. The writer has been unable to find any record of his service as a soldier, but suppose his company served as a local defense for the community. This country was then an unbroken wilderness and often traversed by bands of hostile savages, who watched with a jealous eye the encroachment of the white man on what they considered their domain. After Braddock's defeat by the Indians, which took place on July 9. 1755, the whole of the Virginia frontier was thrown open to savage invasions, and their marauding bands were frequently passing over the country. About this time several persons were killed, and others taken prisoner in this vicinity. Alexander Black died in the year 1764. Name of his wife is unknown. I do not know where he was buried but probably at the Blue Spring Presbyterian Church near the village of Williamsville in Bath County. His farm of 250 acres on the Cowpasture River was divided between his two sons. He and his unknown wife were the parents of six known children. 2 William (indicates that Alexander's father was named William, after Scottish tradition) 3 Alexander 4 Rachel 5 Mary 6 Nancy 7 Elizabeth (Peggy) End


Heavy migration of Scotch-Irish, Welsh, and Germans from Pennsylvania into Virginia began about 1730. Augusta County became the haven for Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. While Augusta County was officially formed from Orange County in 1738, it wasn't until 1745 that the first court was held. http://www.rootsweb.com/~vaaugust/augusta2.html

Brenda's Message to the Message Boards after receiving the book 2/02 Book "William Black and his Descendants" PA, VA, KY, IN I found and received the book from Interlibrary Loan Program, Madison, WI, the book is also in IN and OH. (See below). Generally, the time period is up to about 1948. "William Black and his Descendants; a Genealogy of the Descendants of William Black of Augusta County, Virginia and later of Clark County, Kentucky," Howard Clifton Black, 1973. Held by the Allen County Public Library, Indiana and the Public Library of Cincinnati, Ohio. From what I understand, this book is the best resource for this line of William Black and Sarah Hicklin (VA to KY). The information in the book was collected by Howard Clifton Black (1894-1964, West Liberty, Champaign Co., OH) who lived, unmarried in his great-grandfather's farmhouse built in 1818. Howard Black's parents were James Washington Black and Lizzie Robbins. They lived in this farmhouse when married and died there. The actual author of the book is Raymond Finley Hughes (b. 1890) who was married to Howard's sister, Geneva Belle Black (b. 1891). The book was copyrighted in 1973 but not published. Hughes' children were born1913-1918. Getting permission to reprint or copy might be quite difficult because it was not published. Raymond's address in 1973 was Cincinnati, OH. Follows is a bit of a synopsis of the book; "Revolutionary Service of William Black proved on the DAR lineage of Mrs. Robert E. Morrison (Maxine Geneva Hughes) National Number 301152." The first 2 pages give a description of the movement of the Scotch-Irish Black family from Edinburgh, Scotland to Londonderry, Ireland to America.(He writes in general terms and doesn't give any sources or references.)They left for religious freedom and had been through several hundred years of turmoil. "They landed on the Delaware River above where Wilmington now stands, between the years 1710 and 1720. Many of them remained here while others settled on the Brandywine River in Pennsylvania." The Scotch-Irish families are described as farmers by trade and Presbyterian. They were drawn to PA for the rich land and religious freedoms. Further described as firm, tenacious, resolute and ready to fight because of their hard times in Scotland and Ireland. Again, the writer gives no other information about the Black's beginnings in Edinburgh or Londonderry. The Immigrant, Alexander Black, was born aboard the ship that sailed to America according to an interview with Major George Black (included in the book). He is next heard from when he buys property on the Cowpasture River, VA in 1746. "It appears almost certain that he came into VA from PA with other Scotch-Irish who settled in VA at that time, and that his parents died in PA as no trace of them is found in the Augusta County Records." His wife was unknown, he qualified as a Foot Soldier in 1752and he died in 1764. His children were; William, Alexander, Rachel, Mary, Nancy and Elizabeth (Peggy). The majority of the book gives the descendency of the Immigrant's children. (Am using the author's spelling, including typos.)

1) William (abt. 1734 VA - Feb 14, 1811 KY) m. Sarah Hickling. Children, all born in Augusta Co., VA, listed below.
2) Alexander (1752 VA - April 18, 1827 KY) m. Agnes "Nancy" Kinkead(1766-1818). No offspring
3) Rachel m. Mr. Givings. Children; Samuel, Alexander, William, James& George
4) Mary m. Mr. Miller. Children; Robert, George, Sarah & Mary
5) Nancy m. Mr. McClung. Children; Charles, John & Elizabeth
6) Elizabeth "Peggy" m. Thomas Phemster/Femster

Children of Peggy, Rachel, Mary OR Nancy were; Rachel & Jane

William & Sarah's Children

1) Alexander (10/14/1765-6/16/1854) m. Jane Crockett (1770-1849).Children; Martha, William, James, Alexander, Sarah, John, Samuel C. &Harrison M.
2) Margaret (3/4/1768-?) m. John McCreary. Children' Elijah & George
3) Ginney (10/4/1772-?) m. Mr. Peebles. Children; William B.
4) Major George (7/8/1775-9/24/1859) m. Elizabeth Miller (5/4/1774-2/14/1831). Children; Miller, Alexander, Andrew (Brenda's ancestor), Albert, daughter, daughter, daughter.
5) William (11/3/1780-bef. 1827)
6) Rachel (2/3/1782-?) m. John Barnes. Children; Alexander & a daughter
7) Robert (7/14/1786-12/6/1828) m. Eleanor Wilson. Children; Margaret, America, Alexander, Asa Miller & John Wilson
8) Nancy (12/1/1789-1858) m. Robert Patton. (Robert's sister was Elizabeth, Davey Crockett's 2nd wife). Moved to TX. Children; Andrew Black, William Black, & Sarah W. Black

Rest of the book contains interviews, wills, letters, extracts, Index, etc. End of Message


More About ALEXANDER BLACK: Arrival to America: Probably from Londonderry, Ireland to Pennsylvania with other Scotch-Irish Burial: 1764, Probably at the Blue Spring Presbyterian Church near the village of Williamsville in Bath Co., VA Deed Grant: November 03, 1750, In Richmond , VA for land Heritage: Probably Edinburgh, Scotland to Londonderry, Ireland Land Purchase (1): 1746, 250 acres of land on the Cowpasture River at the forks of the Bullpasture in Augusta Co. (now Bath Co.) Virginia Military service: August 20, 1752, Qualified as a lieutenant of Foot Soldiers before the County Court in Augusta Co. Hughes' Book "has been unable to find any record of his service as a soldier, but suppose his company served as a local defense for the community Will: 1764, Land was given to his 2 sons, William & Alexander

Children of ALEXANDER BLACK and UNKNOWN are:

2. i. CAPT. WILLIAM2 BLACK, b. Bet. 1735 - 1740, Augusta County, VA(now Bath Co.); d. February 1811, Clark County, KY.
3. ii. SAMUEL BLACK, b. 1727; d. 1783.
4. iii. NANCY BLACK.
iv. MARTHA BLACK.
5. v. RACHEL BLACK, b. Augusta County, VA (now Bath Co.). vi. ALEXANDER BLACK3,4,5, b. Abt. 1752, Augusta County, VA (now Bath Co.); d. April 18, 1827, KY; m. AGNES KINKEAD6,7, September 22,1790, Woodford County, KY by Rev. Samuel Shannon; b. November 01, 1766;d. August 29, 1827, KY.

Notes for ALEXANDER BLACK: William Black who married Sarah Hicklin was a brother to Alexander Black Jr., as mentioned in his will, and therefore the son of Alexander Black Sr. Excerpt from the Will of Alexander Black Jr: "It is my will that all my estate except the slaves who are to be emancipated and except the specific devices hereinafter mentioned shall be equally divided among the children, who may be living at the time of my death, of my sister Rachel Givings, my sister Mary Miller, my sister Nancy McClung, my sister Peggy Phemster, and my brother William Black."

Alexander Black Jr was born abt 1752 and died 18 April 1827 age 75 and married Agnes Kinkead in Sept. 1790. http://genforum.genealogy.com/black/messages/1265.html

They had no children

More About ALEXANDER BLACK, Jr.: Burial: Pisgah Churchyard, Pisgah Presbyterian Church, eight miles west of Lexington, KY Inheritance: Bet. 1764 - 1792, Part of Cowpasture farm (VA) from his father Lived in: September 16, 1793, Clark Co., KY Tax List Military service: Served in Dunmore & Revolutionary Wars for Augusta Co, VA according to "Annals of Bath County, VA" by Morton Moved to: Bet. 1784 - 1790, To KY Residence: Bet. March 11, 1794 - 1827, Fayette Co., KY; bought 118 acres of land and lived there till his death

More About AGNES KINKEAD: Burial: Pisgah Churchyard, Pisgah Presbyterian Church, eight miles west of Lexington, KY

More About ALEXANDER BLACK and AGNES KINKEAD: Marriage: September 22, 1790, Woodford County, KY by Rev. Samuel Shannon

vii. SAMUEL BLACK.
6. viii. MARY BLACK.
ix. NANCY BLACK.


AUGUSTA COUNTY, VIRGINIA - CHALKLEY'S CHRONICLES OF THE SCOTCH IRISH INVIRGINIA ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/va/augusta/court/court22.txt


http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~mabry/collins/np63.html#iin1304 Source Don Mabry Note for: Alexander Black, BET. 1710 - 1720 - 1764 Index


Alexander Black (1710/20 - 1764), according to early family papers, was born on a ship when his family was coming from Ireland. Unfor-tunately, the names of his parents are not mentioned. The tradition is that the ancestors of the Black family originated in Scotland but left there early in the 16th century after long years of religious unrest. They went to Ireland where they settled near Londonderry where, two hundred years later they again found themselves embroiled in religious controversy when King James II sought to establish Roman Catholicism throughout his realm. The Blacks were probably among the many who left Ireland shortly after the siege of Londonderry. Alexander Black's parents probably came to Pennsylvania and may well have died there. He was almost certainly among those who migrated several years later down the "Valley of Virginia", where he first appears in 1746 when he purchased 250 acres on the Cowpasture River in that part of Augusta County that later became Bath County. Alexander Black's land was just above the mouth of the Bullpasture River. Payment consisted of the obligation to clear five acres of land each year for three years for each fifty acres purchased. On 16 August 1752 Alexander, along with John McCreary and Wallace E still appraised the estate of Ann Wright. Four days later, on 20 August, Alexander Black appeared before the court where he qualified as Lieutenant of a company of Foot Soldiers. The date of his death is not known but it must have been late in 1764 since his son, William Black made bond as administrator of Alexander's estate on November 20th of that year.

Children of Alexander Black and are:

i. William Black, born in Augusta County, Virginia (Bath); died 1811 in Clark County, Kentucky; married Sarah Hicklin 12 Jan 1763 in Augusta County, Virginia.
ii. Mary Black. Notes for Mary Black: married Mr. Miller.
iii. Nancy Black. Notes for Nancy Black: married Thomas McClung 24 Jan1765 in Augusta County, Virginia.
iv. Martha Black. Notes for Martha Black: Martha Black who married Mr. Wardlow may or may not be a daughter of Alexander Black.
v. Margaret Black, born 1743. Notes for Margaret Black: married William Pheamster 21 Jun 1763 in Augusta County, Virginia.
vi. Rachel Black, born 1750 in Augusta County, Virginia; died 1822 in Lincoln County, Kentucky.
Notes for Rachel Black: married George Givens.
vii. Alexander Black, born 1752 in Augusta County, Virginia; died 18 Apr1827 in Fayette County, Kentucky. Notes for Alexander Black: married Nancy (Agnes) Kinkead 22 Sep 1790 in Woodford County, Kentucky.
References
  1. Rootsweb, http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~mabry/collins/gp20.html#head3.

    Donald E. Collins
    181 Turkey Lane
    Bailey, CO 80421-2073
    United States
    303-816-1540
    dcollins@@bewellnet.com

  2. Raymond Finley Hughes and Howard Clift Black. William Black and his Descendents A Genealogy of the Descendents of William Black of Augusta County, VA and la. (Unpublished. Copyrighted 1973 by Hughes).
  3. Oren Frederic Morton. A History of Highland County, Virginia. (1911, Digitized by Google 2008).
  4. Presumably this means that Alexander named his son William, after Alexander's father. This may be so, or perhaps William son of Alexander, is just guessing. Irt may also be that this is an insertion by Hughes, 1973, assuming that Alexander's first born son would be named after his father "after Scottish tradition". This is especially true since Hughes also notes that George, grandson of Alexander, "failed to mention the names of the immigrants so we do not know the names of the first generation of this family in America". This probably explains why some believe there's no evidence as to identity of the immigrant patriarch of the family. Nonetheless, it would be useful to search Old Chester County records for a "William Black", and to seek out the original Draper MSC document to verify this interview.
  5. "Peggy" is usually a nickname for "Margaret", not "Elizabeth". Perhaps there was a seventh child named "Margaret".