Family:Unknown Lockridge and Unknown Unknown (1)

 
Lockridge (add)
 
m. bef. 1695
Facts and Events
Marriage? bef. 1695
Children
BirthDeath
1.
Abt. 1695 Ireland
Aft. 1764
2.
Est. 1700-1717
 

James and William Lockridge were brothers that migrated to early Augusta County, Virginia. Some of the information on their families is located in DESCENDENTS OF JAMES AND WILLIAM LOCKRIDGE, Pioneer Brothers of Early Augusta County, Virginia. Revision III, Printed August 24, 2000. Compiled by Robert B and Harriet H Walters.


http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mmcall&id=I08562

Source DESCENDENTS OF JAMES AND WILLIAM LOCKRIDGE, Pioneer Brothers of Early Augusta County, Virginia. Revision III, Printed August 24, 2000. Compiled by Robert B and Harriet H Walters.

  • p. 2:

"The Lockridge Family is of Scottish ancestry. As might be expected, the name can be found spelled in a number of variations, including Lockridge, Lochridge, Laughridge, Loughridge, Louchridge, Lockbridge, Louchrage, Loghridge, Lotridge, Lodridge and in other less obvious ways. Lockridge is in most cases the spelling used in the records of the western Virginia records, with a few isolated variations. James is presumed to be an immigrant form Northern Ireland, along with many of the other Scotch-Irish pioneers of early Augusta County, Virginia."

Our first record of James and his brother, William, in Augusta County (then Orange Co.) was 3 Feb 1741, baptism date of William's son, James. Then 25 Jun 1742, William's deed when he purchased land in the Borden Grant from Benjamin Borden. They may have arrived somewhat earlier, say 1739-1740. George W. Cleek states they arrived in Augusta Co. about 1730, but I believe that is much too early for western Augusta County. ...James Lockridge settled in the Pastures, a valley area in western Augusta and northern Rockbridge counties. The Pastures region contained many open, grassy areas, thus the source of its name. It was rich in wildlife, and a favored hunting ground for several Indian tribes of the region. The area was not claimed by a particular tribe, but was shared - though not harmoniously at times. The Pastures gave its name to the rivers flowing through it. Traveling from east to west, the rivers are the Little Calfpasture River, the Great (or Big) Calfpasture R., the Cowpasture R. and the Bullpasture R., which lies almost entirely within what is now Highland Co, Va. ...James purchased Lot #14, 280 acres, on 2 Apr 1745. He later bought Lot #17, 520 acres, but made Lot #14 his home place. ...James and Isabella sold the farm to their son, Andrew, in 1764. ...James was well regarded by the community as evidenced by being nominated as a Justice to the first County Court of Augusta in 1745. ...In all probability, James I remained in Augusta County, probably remaining on the home place with his son, Andrew. ..Since Isabella does not appear in the deed to Andrew, she may have been deceased. This plus perhaps failing health, may have encouraged James to dispose of his land and retire with one of the children. James did not leave a known will in Augusta Co., but this may have been because he had already distributed his assets."

  • p. 4

"Early in my research of the Lockridge family, I assumed that the James and Isabella Lockridge of Long Cane Settlement in Granville Co., SC was James Lockridge I. Even then, I thought it most strange that a man 70 to 75 years of age would sell his prosperous farms on the Big Calfpasture River and move to a new frontier which was constantly threatened by Indian incursions. However, after learning that his sone, James II, also married an Isabella, I now firmly believe that James II is the South Carolina frontiersman. In all prbability, James I remained in Augusta County, probalby remaining on the home place with his son, Andrew. At this time, mid 1760's, he also had other children nearby. Robert, Margaret Gay and Elizabeth Graham. Since Isabella does not appear in the deed to Andrew (above), she may have been deceased. This, plus perhaps failing health, may have encouraged James to dispose of his land and retire with one of the children. James did not leave a known will in Augusta Co., but this may have been because he had already distributed his assets.