Family:Samuel Rice and Mary Dix (1)

Browse
Facts and Events
Marriage[1][2][3][4] Abt. Aug 1668
Children
BirthDeath
1.
 
2.
 
3.
 
References
  1. Bond, Henry, M.D. Family Memorials. Genealogies of the Families and Descendants of the Early Settlers of Watertown, Massachusetts, Including Waltham and Weston (1855): To Which Is Appended the Early History of the Town. With Illustrations, Maps and Notes. (Boston, Mass.: Little, Brown, and Company, 1855), 124.

    Married in August or September 1668.

  2. 1661-1670, in Rodgers, Robert H. (Robert Howard), and Massachusetts. County Court (Middlesex County). Middlesex County in the colony of the Massachusetts Bay in New England: records of probate and administration. (Boston, Massachusetts: New England Historic Genealogical Society, c1999-c2001), 404.

    Testimony of "Thomas Fleg Jnr: of Watertowne, guardian to [daughter] Lidya Browne": "She so remayned widow abought one yeere, and then marryed to Samuel Rice." [Since inventory of first husband Abraham Browne was dated 28 Sep 1667, this is in approximate agreement with Henry Bond.]

  3. Ward, Andrew Henshaw. A Genealogical History of the Rice Family: Descendants of Deacon Edmund Rice, who came from Barkhamstead, England and settled at Sudbury, Massachusetts, in 1638 or 9. (Boston: C. Benjamin Richardson, 1858), 8.

    Samuel Rice m. (2) Sudbury Sept. 1668 Mary (Dix) Brown, widow of Abraham Brown. Abraham Brown, s/o Abraham Brown and Mary Dix, is called the son in law of Samuel Rice in his death record (see also Source:Marlborough, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Vital Records of Marlborough, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849, p. 350).

  4. Three births are recorded in Source:Marlborough, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. Vital Records of Marlborough, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849 to Samuel and Elizabeth after the proposed marriage to Mary in 1668. However, the first child is named Mary, and the county returns for the other two differ from the town record in naming the parents as Samuel and Mary. Given the other evidence supporting the proposed marriage, it seems likely that the town clerk erred in naming the mother Elizabeth.